New Names in the Meat Case

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 By: Laura Gorecki

I like to call myself an educated farm kid and know the difference between the front end and back end of a pig. However, I am still a little clueless when it comes to cooking the pork that comes from that pig. Thankfully, the National Pork Board is working to help consumers, like me, understand our pork chops better. In order to make pork labels and cuts more consumer-friendly, the National Pork Board updated the Uniform Retail Meat Identification Standards used by most grocery stores and restaurants. The names of popular cuts, such as the pork loin chop and the pork rib chop, have been updated to match similar beef cuts. This makes it easier for consumers to identify the quality and cooking requirements of these pork cuts. The new labeling guidelines also include suggested preparation methods of the meat in order to maximize the eating experience. As a college student, I was personally excited about the cooking instructions because it allows me to be more confident as I purchase and prepare pork products on my own.

To give you an idea of what to look for in the grocery store, here are some examples of the changes that will be made this summer:new cuts newcuts2

Along with these popular chops, the pork butt will now be called the Boston roast. I am very glad they are making this change in particular because the previous name was very misleading and caused confusion among consumers. I think that the new marketing names will boost sales during this summer’s grilling season by showcasing pork as a premiere product in the meat case and on the dinner table.

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