Conserving your pork

 

 

 

 

By: Emma Likens

With the growing global population, many environmental experts are recommending “eating down the food chain” to conserve water and crops used to produce feed for livestock.  In actuality, hogs have a 3 to 1 feed conversion ratio, according to the Pork Checkoff Quick Facts.  This rate is continually improving and something for pork producers to be proud of.

Being an avid pork consumer, my simple suggestion is to stop wasting food.  I was raised in a family where we always cleaned our plates before leaving the dinner table.  A recent Huffington Post article found that Americans throw out nearly half of their food, which equals about 165 billion pounds of food.

Along with clearing my plate, I learned to happily eat leftovers at an early age.  Some things just never taste as good the second time around, but pork roast is not one of them.  So in an effort to encourage an end to wasting food and eating leftovers, next time you have leftover pork roast after a family get together (as we do after Thanksgiving, turkey is only a side dish!), try out this recipe from The Food Network.

Funked Out Pork Quesadilla

4 Servings

Ingredients

Crema:

1 C low-fat Greek yogurt

1 lime, zested and juiced

3 T chopped fresh cilantro

2 tsp chipotle en adobo sauce

Salt and freshly ground black pepper

 

Quesadillas:

½ C red onion, chopped

½ C chopped pickled jalapenos, juices reserved

2 C shredded roasted pork shoulder

2 C shredded Monterrey Jack

Nonstick olive oil spray

4 large whole wheat tortillas

 

Directions

For the crema:  Combine the yogurt, lime zest and juice, cilantro and adobo sauce in a small bowl, stirring well to combine.  Season with salt and pepper and set aside.

For the quesadillas:  Preheat a grill pan and spray with nonstick spray.

Soak the onions in the jalapeno juice about 10 minutes.  Drain.

In a large bowl, mix together the jalapenos, onions, pork and cheese.  Divide the mix on top of 2 tortilla rounds.  Top each with another tortilla round.  Spray the round with olive oil and place face down onto the grill.  Grill until the cheese is melted and the tortillas begin to brown, about 3 minutes.  Flip and cook an additional 3 minutes.  Remove the quesadillas from the grill pan, cut each into quarters and serve with the crema.

Pork On Your Fork: Warm Holiday Ham Crescents

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Times

Prep Time: 10 minutes
Cook Time: 15 minutes

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Ingredients

1/2 pound brown-sugar fully-cooked ham, shaved
1 8 oz-can crescent dinner rolls, refrigerated
4 slices mozzarella cheese, OR Swiss, cut diagonally
3 tablespoons mayonnaise, OR salad dressing
1 tablespoon Dijon mustard

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Cooking Directions

Separate package of crescent rolls into triangles; place on waxed paper. Place cheese triangle over each dough triangle. Divide ham among the 8 dough/cheese triangles. Beginning at widest end, roll up to form a crescent. Place on baking sheet that has been coated with cooking spray. Bake at 375 degrees F for 13 to 15 minutes. Meanwhile, in small bowl, stir together mayonnaise and mustard; serve with Ham Crescents.

Makes 8 servings.

*Use leftover spiral-sliced ham from your holiday meals, if desired.


Serving Suggestions Icon

Serving Suggestions

Easy warm ham sandwiches that use convenience foods to make a tasty dish. Serve with tomato soup and a leafy salad.


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Nutrition

Calories: 229 calories
Protein: 11 grams
Fat: 14 grams
Sodium: 674 milligrams
Cholesterol: 17 milligrams
Saturated Fat: 4 grams
Carbohydrates: 14 grams
Fiber: 0 grams

Random Cooking Tip:

Do not overcrowd pork cuts when sautéing. Leaving space between them will allow them to brown and cook more evenly.

Recipe from: PorkBeInspired.com

Pork On Your Fork: Ham and Almond Pastry Ring

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Prep Time: 20 minutes
Cook Time: 30 minutes

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Ingredients

1 cup cooked ham, diced
1/2 cup chive and onion cream cheese spread
2 tablespoons Caesar dressing
1 large apple, seeded and chopped
1/2 cup grapes, red or green, quartered
1/2 cup red onion, finely chopped
1/4 cup green bell pepper, diced
2 8-oz cans refrigerated crescent rolls
1 egg, beaten
1/4 cup almonds, finely chopped
Nonstick cooking spray

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Cooking Directions

In large bowl, blend cream cheese spread and dressing. Add ham, apple, grapes, onion and green pepper; gently stir until coated. Set aside.

Line a large baking sheet with heavy foil. Lightly coat with nonstick cooking spray. Unroll both cans of crescent rolls and separate. On prepared baking sheet arrange triangles overlapping with shortest side of each roll toward center leaving 5-inch circle open in center. Points of crescent dough may hang over edge of baking sheet. Press overlapping dough to flatten and close center circle to 4-inches.

Spoon mixture evenly over widest part of dough. Pull points of dough over filling and tuck dough under dough in center to form ring. (Some filling will be visible.) Brush dough evenly with beaten egg and sprinkle with almonds. Bake in preheated oven at 375 degrees F. for 25-30 minutes or until golden and pastry in inner circle is baked. (If necessary, loosely cover outer edge of pastry with foil during the last 10 minutes of baking to prevent over-browning.) Remove from oven and cool on baking sheet for 5 minutes. Using large spatula, carefully slide onto large serving platter.*

Makes 8 to 10 servings.
*If desired, use foil to lift and transfer pastry ring to serving platter. Cut foil in center of ring and underneath pastry ring; pull foil pieces to remove.


Serving Suggestions Icon

Serving Suggestions

Bring the brunch crowd in with this pretty and delicious pastry ring.  Serve along with Four Fruit Salad, Asparagus Spears with Citrus-Ginger Dip, and other brunch favorites.


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Nutrition

Calories: 385 calories
Protein: 12 grams
Fat: 23 grams
Sodium: 573 milligrams
Cholesterol: 58 milligrams
Saturated Fat: 8 grams
Carbohydrates: 30 grams
Fiber: 1 grams

Random Leftover Tip:
Make a salad with leftover pork!

Recipe from: PorkBeInspired.com

I’m Thankful For a Pork Farmer

 

 

 

 

 

 

By: Holly Fujan

With the Thanksgiving holiday soon approaching, most people take this time of year to think about what they are thankful for. Having the opportunity to spend Thanksgiving Day with my family and friends, and of course having good food on the table I have decided that this year I am thankful for pork farmers. Not only am I thankful for pork farmers in general, but there is one specifically that comes to the top of my list, my father. I thankful for my father not only because of all he does for me, as well as being a good role model, I am also thankful for him because I know he is helping to feed Nebraska. Most of the time I think many people take for granted the ease of being able to go into their refrigerator and pulling out some bacon to make a BLT sandwich or going to the store and picking up pork tenderloin to make on the holidays.  Being part of a pork producing family, I know the time and effect it takes our pork farmers to get those products on our kitchen tables.

Whether or not we realize it there is also a need for concern with the hunger issues in our state.  In Nebraska there are many people who will not have enough food that they and their families need over Thanksgiving this year.  The Nebraska Pork Association has helped to make this apparent through events such as the “Pigs on Parade” Public Art Project to raise money to fight hunger and the Giant Canstruction presented at the Nebraska State Fair to raise public awareness of food insecurities many individuals face.

This should be a small reminder that we need to take time to thank our pork farmers for all they provide for us, as well as their fight in helping prevent hunger in Nebraska. Happy Thanksgiving!

 

Pork On Your Fork: Companys Coming Pork Roast

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Prep Time: 15 minutes
Cook Time: 1 hour

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Ingredients

2-3 pound boneless pork roast

Glaze:

1/2 cup honey mustard
3 tablespoons prepared horseradish
2 tablespoons brown sugar

Garnish:

2 16-oz cans peach halves, drained
2 tablespoons brown sugar
1 teaspoon cinnamon
2 tablespoons butter


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Cooking Directions

Heat oven to 350 degrees F. Place roast in shallow roasting pan and roast for 45-60 minutes.Meanwhile, in small bowl mix together Glaze ingredients. Spread Glaze over roast the last 20 minutes, continue roasting until internal temperature on a thermometer reads 145 degrees F. Remove roast from oven; let rest about 10 minutes.

Place peach halves in shallow baking dish, cut side up. Sprinkle peaches with combined 2 tablespoons brown sugar and cinnamon; dot with butter.  Slice roast and serve surrounded by peaches.

While pork is resting, place peaches in oven for 15 minutes to heat through.

Serves 8-12


Serving Suggestions Icon

Serving Suggestions

Your grandmother probably made a roast like this. It’s a timeless favorite. Serve with your favorite sides like baked potatoes, green beans and salad.


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Nutrition

Calories: 272 calories
Protein: 25 grams
Fat: 10 grams
Sodium: 140 milligrams
Cholesterol: 70 milligrams
Saturated Fat: 3 grams
Carbohydrates: 25 grams

Random Cooking Tip:

When you are in a hurry—turn to cuts that cook up quickly, such as chops, tenderloins and cutlets.

Recipe from: PorkBeInspired.com

Dear Future Mentors….

 

 

 

 

 

 

By:Erin Oswald

Dear Student,

 

Ever considered being part of a group that extends your knowledge base, widens your horizon, and provides an array of exciting experiences? Then the Pork Mentoring Program is for you!

 

Being involved or interested in Agriculture and the pork industry is ideal, but if you’re not a producer or don’t currently have plans to work in agriculture, don’t rule out the program – there’s something here for you.

 

As a 2012 graduate of the program, I’m here to give you the inside scoop. I am a junior at UNL majoring in Business Management and Economics. How am I connected to the pork industry, you may ask? I was raised on a swine farm (don’t worry, I lived in the house, not the barns) and learned first hand about the operations of a small family farm. When I moved to college, I thought I would leave the farm life behind and enter the corporate world. It didn’t take me long to realize not only how important my farm roots were to me, but also how impactful agriculture is in everyone’s life. Not far into college, the program was recommended to me. As I’m sure you’re guessing, I was accepted! And it turns out I was the odd ball – the only non-Ag major student in my class. And here’s my main statement to you: Agriculture is a part of your life, no matter your major or career path.

 

I have gathered a plethora of valuable experiences through the program. Three of the most valuable lessons I learned are the following: You have your own voice at all times and it’s a powerful one, you are valuable to the pork industry, and you make the experience.

 

As a young adult forging your path in this world, sometimes it can seem as if adults and peers are drowning you out. In this program, your stance and opinion are always important. You do not need to fear being overshadowed or like a puppy on a leash. Additionally, you are a part of the program because you are valuable! You’ll learn this as you go, but you really are the future. Your work, experience, and knowledge contribute to and build the tomorrow of the swine industry. And finally, in the program, you make each experience what it is. If you would choose not to participate in things like Ribfest, State Fair, and others, that is your choice, but you’d be missing out on incredible opportunities. I encourage you to jump into the program! Be a part of everything you possibly can, ask questions, and push yourself to try things you wouldn’t have considered before. You won’t regret it!

 

 

The swine industry is not longer simple a part of my past, but it has become one of my future focuses. I may not have my own farm someday, but I will support Agriculture and the swine industry. The Pork Mentor Program helped me learn my role in agriculture. Find your role when you become a member of the 2013 mentor class!