Pork On Your Fork: Sauteed Pork Tenderloin Medallions with Lemon-Garlic Sauce

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Times

Prep Time: 10 minutes
Cook Time: 10 minutes

Ingredients Icon

Ingredients

1 pork tenderloin, (1 pound), trimmed
1/4 teaspoon salt, divided
1/4 teaspoon plus 1/8 teaspoon black pepper, divided
2 teaspoons olive oil, divided
2 cloves garlic, minced
1/2 cup dry white wine, (for non-alcoholic, substitute low-sodium chicken broth)
1/2 cup chicken broth, low-sodium
Grated zest and 1 tablespoon lemon juice , from 1 lemon
1 tablespoon fresh parsley, chopped, OR 1 1/2 teaspoons chopped fresh sage or rosemary*

Cooking Directions Icon

Cooking Directions

Cut pork into 12 slices, about 1-inch thick. Sprinkle pork on all sides with 1/8 teaspoon of the salt and 1/4 teaspoon of the pepper. Heat 1 teaspoon of the oil in a large heavy skillet over medium-high heat. Add the pork and cook, turning once, until the pork is well browned and internal temperature reaches 145 degrees F, about 1 1/2 minutes on each side. Transfer pork to serving platter and cover to keep warm.

Add the remaining 1 teaspoon oil to skillet. Add garlic and cook, stirring constantly, until garlic is fragrant, about 30 seconds. Add the wine and broth. Increase heat to high and cook, stirring to scrape up the browned bits from the bottom of the skillet, until the liquid is reduced by two thirds, about 5 minutes.

Remove the skillet from the heat and stir in the remaining 1/8 teaspoon salt, remaining 1/8 teaspoon pepper, the lemon zest and juice, and the parsley. Serve the pork medallions drizzled with the sauce (makes a generous 1/3 cup; about 1 1/2 tablespoons per serving).

*To substitute fresh herbs with dried herbs, use 1 1/2 teaspoons dried parsley or 3/4 teaspoon dried sage, or 3/4 teaspoon dried rosemary

Makes 4 servings


Serving Suggestions Icon

Serving Suggestions

Serve the pork with whole wheat linguine or brown jasmine rice to soak up all the delicious lemon sauce. Steamed broccoli rabe or spinach would make a terrific accompaniment.

Nutrition Icon

Nutrition

Calories: 150 calories
Protein: 24 grams
Fat: 5 grams
Sodium: 220 milligrams
Cholesterol: 75 milligrams
Saturated Fat: 1 grams
Carbohydrates: 1 grams
Fiber: 0 grams

Random Safety Tip:

Cover a plate with plastic wrap to carry pork to the grill. Throw away. Use the clean plate carry food back in!

Recipe from: PorkBeInspired.com

Drought Felt Through Entire Industry – Global Economy Could Take a Hit

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

By: Erin Oswald

Recently, I had the opportunity to meet with Financial Officer, Kelley Johansen, of Farm Credit Services of America located in Columbus, NE. The majority of our discussion revolved around the topic most farmers and Midwest citizens find themselves conversing about: the current drought. Our discussion tied back to grain prices at every point of interest. Many markets including the swine industry are tied to this year’s yields.  Kelley Johansen noted that a lot of work has been done to build the current demand for the swine industry. He is concerned that lacking yields will kill that product demand. I agree with his concerns. He suggested viewing the situation macro economically. With such high grain prices, swine production will be forced to reduce production. Mr. Johansen noted that in the past, many agricultural markets used to be stable as a unit. Now, however, the grain markets pull the swine industry along.

Ph. D Student in the Department of Economics at the University of Nebraska in Lincoln, Hanna Hartman, offered this macro economical breakdown of the situation: “Of course with a drought comes a decrease in the supply of commodities, which has impact not only on the crop markets but livestock and other products as well. Therefore, we will see many price increases as the supply of a key input (corn, for example) for many products decreases. Suppliers will likely pass along a portion of the increase in input prices along to the consumer, which will increase the price of many of the products consumers purchase. The increase in input prices for supplies of goods that rely on commodities in short supply because of the drought will likely cause those suppliers to provide less of their product. The demand will increase in markets of goods that are substitutes for goods affected by the drought, causing an increase in prices of these substitute goods as well. However, because we engage in trade, we will be able to import some of the goods (corn, for example) to help minimize the effect the drought has on domestic goods. But the U.S. exports commodities, too, so there will be an overall supply decrease in the world market for some commodities, which will drive up the “world price” for these goods. Not only will U.S. consumers experience an increase in prices, but also many areas worldwide may experience an increase in prices due to the drought here. On a positive note, at least a larger percent of U.S. farmers have crop insurance and insure a larger portion of their crop relative to the last time we’ve had drought conditions this severe and suppliers who haven’t had the drought influence their goods will receive higher prices for their goods. Hopefully, next year’s crop will fair better and the increase in prices that we will likely experience this year will fall when there is a larger supply (relative to this year’s supply) of commodities next year.” This explanation can be simply followed even if economics are not your forte.

I will personally continue to carefully observe worldwide economics and its impact on the present and future of the swine industry. From Farm Credit Services, Kelley Johansen recommends that you know your bottom line. Figure out your costs down to the penny and put yourself in a financially stable position. He noted that many producers estimate their bottom line and underestimate. Risk management is extremely important at this time and putting too much on the line with no price protection could cause extreme losses. Producers need to be aware of their breakeven price and overall financial position.

My Internship and Telling Agriculture’s Story

 

 

 

 

 

 

By: Emma Likens

When I first accepted my internship offer last February with EdMedia, it didn’t occur to me at the time that I would be foregoing my mother’s cooking for the summer.  And while I believe Lincoln will never compare to the wide open spaces of the rest of Nebraska, surviving off my own cooking in the city while interning at EdMedia has definitely been worth it.

EdMedia is a division of the Institute of Agriculture and Natural Resources which produces multimedia communications for UNL Extension and faculty and outside clients.  EdMedia has the talent and resources to make a wide variety media, everything from producing HD videos to creating apps.  They also produce two TV shows, Market Journal and Backyard Farmer.

As an intern, I’ve been working on Backyard Farmer and helping write and edit radio content for Ag Almanac.  I’ve learned a wide variety of skills, including how to use and HD video camera and to how to use a Mac computer.  While using a Mac might seem rather insignificant, I am quite proud to call myself computer bilingual now 🙂

Silliness aside, I’ve learned a lot about all aspects of agriculture and horticulture through the projects I’ve been working on.  My background is in pork production, so topics like skip row planting, woodchucks as garden pests and soybean diseases were new to me and exciting to learn about.  I’ve even got to work with some radio announcements about TQA certification and other things related to pork production.

The most valuable lesson I’ve learned from my internship is the art of storytelling through video.  I am by no means a pro, but I’ve came a long ways since the day I first picked up a camera and was instructed to go shoot something I found interesting.  Naturally, I took the camera home one weekend and shot some footage of the hogs, which actually ended up in a Market Journal segment.  Even though it only played for about three seconds, it’s still a great feeling knowing other people are watching your work.

Finally, one of the most awesome things about my internship is I had the opportunity to produce a video for UNL’s Grow Eat Learn video competition.  Sharing agriculture’s story has always been important to me, so I jumped at the chance to make a video explaining why the agricultural research done at UNL is important both locally and globally (which you can watch here).  While I’m not nearly as funny as the Peterson brothers who created the viral “I’m Farming and I Grow It,” I’m still proud to be telling the world about agriculture.

Thanks for reading!

Pork On Your Fork: Bottom-Of-The-Box Crushed Cracker Pork

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Times

Prep Time: 10 minutes
Cook Time: 15 minutes

Ingredients Icon

Ingredients

1 pound pork tenderloin
1 egg, beaten
1 tablespoon steak sauce
1 teaspoon garlic powder
1 cup cheese crackers, finely crushed
2 tablespoons vegetable oil, divided

Cooking Directions Icon

Cooking Directions

New USDA Guidelines

Combine egg, steak sauce and garlic powder in a shallow dish. Place crushed crackers in another shallow dish.
Cut tenderloin crosswise into 1/2-inch-thick slices. Pound or flatten slices with the heal of your hand to 1/4-inch thickness.
Dip each slice first into egg mixture, then cracker crumbs, turning to coat.
Heat one tablespoon of oil in a large nonstick skillet over medium heat until hot. Add half of pork slices and cook 4 to 5 minutes per side or until browned. Repeat with remaining oil and pork slices (or use 2 skillets at one time).

Serves 4.


Serving Suggestions Icon

Serving Suggestions

Get the kids involved with this fun recipe from Heidi Morris that was an honorable mention for the “No Recipe” recipe contest. A good finger food to serve with your favorite dipping sauce like ranch dressing or barbecue sauce.  Or try Creamy Dijon Mustard Sauce or Mandarin Peach Sauce for a change of pace.


Nutrition Icon

Nutrition

Calories: 328 calories
Protein: 27 grams
Fat: 19 grams
Sodium: 304 milligrams
Cholesterol: 130 milligrams
Saturated Fat: 5 grams
Carbohydrates: 12 grams
Fiber: 1 grams

Random Safety Tip:

Do not use the same surface for cutting uncooked meat and vegetables. Use different cutting board for uncooked meat.

recipe from: PorkBeInspired.com