Pork On Your Fork: Grilled Pork Chops with Basil-Garlic Rub

Grilled Pork Chops with Basil-Garlic Rub

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Times

Prep Time: 30 minutes
Cook Time: 10 minutes

Ingredients Icon

Ingredients

4 pork bone-in rib chops, 3/4-inch thick

Basil-Garlic Rub:

2 cloves garlic , peeled
1 cup fresh basil, packed
2 tablespoons lemon juice , fresh
2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
1 teaspoon coarse salt
1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper


Cooking Directions Icon

Cooking Directions

With machine running, drop garlic through feed tube of food processor to mince. Stop, add fresh basil, and process until chopped. Add lemon juice, oil, salt, and pepper and process to make thin wet rub. Spread both sides of pork chops with basil mixture. Let stand 15 to 30 minutes.

Prepare a medium-hot fire in grill. Brush the grate clean and oil the grate. Grill chops, over direct heat, turning once, to medium rare doneness, 5 to 6 minutes per side, or until the internal temperature reaches 145 degrees Fahrenheit, followed by a 3-minute rest time.

Makes 4 servings


Serving Suggestions Icon

Serving Suggestions

Top the chop with shavings of Parmesan cheese (shave from a wedge of cheese with a vegetable peeler) and toasted pine nuts, if desired. Serve with slices of ripe tomatoes and mozzarella on a bed of arugula drizzled with balsamic vinegar and olive oil or with the Pantry Basil-Garlic Rub.

Nutrition Icon

Nutrition

Calories: 210 calories
Protein: 27 grams
Fat: 14 grams
Sodium: 620 milligrams
Cholesterol: 60 milligrams
Saturated Fat: 4 grams
Carbohydrates: 3 grams
Fiber: 0 grams

Random Safety Tip:
Do not use the same surface for cutting uncooked meat and vegetables. Use different cutting board for uncooked meat.

Recipe from: porkbeinspired.com

Ag Communications in the UK – a Study Abroad Experience

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

By:Emma Likens

For two weeks in May, myself, Dr. Cannon, Dr. Ellis and six other students from K-State journeyed to a country where left is the “right” side of the road, chips are actually fries with no salt, and pubs are the place to be after five p.m.  Instead of going crazy and hitting up every nightclub we could find (although we joked about it from time to time), we traveled from London to Glasgow, visiting agricultural publications, farms and cultural hot spots along the way.  I got my first view of the ocean, the English Channel, nearly got hit by a car in Edinburgh, and managed to get sunburned in a place which is supposed to be rainy 90 percent of the time.  Needless to say, we brought the sunshine with us, and when our two weeks were up we took it back home with us!

Highlights of my study abroad experience include (by order of occurrence):

The London Tower

We had a free day in London to visit whichever sights appealed to us the most.  My uncle Steve, who works in England as a geologist, came to London to show me around.  My favorite sight was the London Tower, which is rich with English history and home to the Queen’s Crown Jewels and an impressive armory display.  As the yeoman (tour guide) said after asking if there were any Americans in the group, “Why so quiet?  If you had just paid your taxes you could call all this history yours too!”

Warwick Castle

This castle is not just any ordinary castle.  Restored to its former medieval glory with lots of interactive exhibits and convenient ice-cream shops, it’s now a huge tourist attraction.  We even climbed all 580 steps (I’m positive they miscounted or rounded down) to one of the towers.  While the view was impressive, climbing up and down that many spiral steps was exhausting!

The Pigs of Bath

Bath is famous for the natural hot springs located there, originally discovered and later forgotten by the Romans.  They were rediscovered by a Celtic prince several hundred years later, who established the current city there.  After being banished from his kingdom due to a terrible skin disease he had, the prince became a pig herder and wandered the country.  He eventually made his way down to Bath, where he noticed how much the pigs enjoyed the mud near the hot springs and how it benefited their health, so he decided to take a dip in the water too.  The water cured his skin disease, after which he returned home a new man.  Today there are numerous artistic pigs scattered around Bath commemorating its historic connection to pigs.

Farm Tours

We had the opportunity to spend an entire day touring the family farms of Rick Jones, a dairy operation, and Robert Leedham, an arable crop and sheep operation.  Both families were eager to show us around and answer questions.  Much of their farming practices are similar to our own, but altered to suit the English climate and much more strictly regulated.  Some major differences I noticed is that they encourage using dairy for beef and their major crops are barley, wheat, and canola.  This was for sure my favorite part of the trip, after spending a week in London being out in the open again reminded me home.

The Scottish Farmer

This was the last publication we visited but also my favorite.  They were a fun group with a great sense of humor.  The Scottish Farmer is very good at connecting with the younger generation of farmers using their Facebook page and annual t-shirt competition, during which readers submit funny slogans to go on that years t-shirt.  They are a huge hit among the Scottish and us Americans too!  Some example slogans are “Ewe want it and you know it” and “Get your hands on a Scottish Farmer.”  Our group got quite excited when the staff offered to send some extras along with us.

The Scotch Whiskey Experience

The Scottish are well known for their whiskey, so much so that they have an interactive exhibit dedicated to the history and making of Scottish whiskey, complete with samples at the end of the tour.  There are four geographic regions Scotch whiskey distilleries are divided into, each with their own unique flavors.  Fun fact, every two minutes 4,680 bottles of 70 cl Scotch whiskey are sold worldwide, which is 39 bottles per second!

Despite the ongoing Huskers vs. K-State jokes (which were completely unnecessary, we don’t even play football against each other anymore), it was a great trip and has given me a fresh perspective on agriculture from a global outlook.  To read more about our adventures, you can go to http://acjintheuk.wordpress.com/  Thanks for reading!

Alltech Symposium brings guests to Kentucky from all over the world

 

 

 


By: Holly Fujan

On May 19th through the 22nd, 2012, I had the opportunity to attend the 28th Annual Alltech Symposium in Lexington, Kentucky. While at the Symposium I had a chance to see what was going on throughout the pork industry not only in the United States, but also in other countries. There were more then 2,000 people who attended the Symposium from all around the world. The main topic of the Symposium was the concern with the growing world population. With the population growing at an incredible rate, Alltech believes that people and industries must explore new ideas in order to plan for the future. They went on to say that agriculture will play a tremendous role in shaping that future as producers are faced with the challenges of feeding the booming global population, which is expected to reach 9 billion people by 2050, as well as dealing with diminishing resources and environmental concerns.

 

While at the Symposium, I also had the chance to attend many sessions which discussed various areas of the pork industry. Speakers from many different countries such as Australia, Chile, Ireland and France attended these sessions and discussed with us the research they had done on topics which included: The challenge of tackling PRRS, the optimal weaning weight for piglets, the concern of nutrition keeping up with genetic changes, and new advances in feeding sows to produce as many piglets as possible per year. The second night we were in Kentucky I even had the chance to eat dinner at the Kentucky Horse Park with one of the speakers from Ireland and discuss with him the pork industry where he is from.

The Symposium was an excellent experience for me. It really helped to better inform me of the issues within the pork industry outside of Nebraska. I really enjoyed getting to meet people from all around the world who were very knowledgeable on the industry, and also passionate about the work that they do. I think this will help me in the future if I would decide to pursue a career directly related to the pork industry after graduation.

Pork On Your Fork: Apricot Glazed Pork Kabobs

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Times

Prep Time: 15 minutes
Cook Time: 15 minutes
Marinating Time: 30 minutes

Ingredients Icon

Ingredients

1 pound boneless pork loin, cut into one-inch cubes
1 10-oz jar apricot preserves
4 tablespoons orange liqueur, OR orange juice
2 tablespoons butter

Cooking Directions Icon

Cooking Directions

New USDA Guidelines
Stir together preserves, liqueur and butter, simmer in a small saucepan until butter is melted. (OR combine ingredients in a 2-cup glass measure; microwave on High 1 minute). Place pork cubes in heavy plastic bag, pour 3/4 cup apricot mixture over to coat. Marinate at least 30 minutes.

Thread pork onto 4-6 skewers, grill over hot coals 10-12 minutes, turning occasionally and basting with marinade. Heat remaining apricot sauce to boiling and serve alongside kabobs, if desired.

Makes 4-6.


Serving Suggestions Icon

Serving Suggestions

This is a fun recipe for summer gatherings. Serve the kabobs with Cool Cucumber Salad, Dr Bills Barbecue Beans, and potato salad.


Nutrition Icon

Nutrition

Calories: 326 calories
Protein: 18 grams
Fat: 9 grams
Sodium: 84 milligrams
Cholesterol: 58 milligrams
Saturated Fat: 4 grams
Carbohydrates: 40 grams
Fiber: 0 grams

Random Tip:
Remember! A little pink is ok.

 Recipe from: porkbeinspired.com

World Pork Expo

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

By: Michelle Semler

On Tuesday June 5th and Wednesday June 6th all eight Peer Mentors had the opportunity to load up in a 15 passenger van with Kyla and head east to the World Pork Expo in Des Moines, Iowa. We had a full schedule of events as we loaded the van Monday evening and were unsure of what we had planned for use for the next few days.

Tuesday we were placed in a conference room for internship and ambassador training. Throughout the day we were exposed to a better understanding of the National Pork Producers Council and the Checkoff with the National Pork Board. While a majority of the time was spent listening to numerous speakers, we also had the opportunity to interact with young adults representing their home state organizations. Many states I expected to meet other interns and ambassadors from such as Iowa, Missouri, and Minnesota, and a majority of states within the Midwest. But I was surprised to learn that California also had an intern.

Being a native of Eastern Iowa and only spreading my wings to Nebraska last August it’s easy to become caught up in the belief that hog production only occurs within these few states. I enjoyed getting to chat with other students and learn how production and agriculture differed within their home states. The day ended with all of us receiving certification through the PQA training, before heading out to dinner and bowling where once again we were giving the opportunity to get to know other students even better.

Wednesday all of our dreams finally came true….we made it to the World Pork Expo!! The morning started with us helping with the Youth PQA training where the ages ranged from those barely able to write their names upwards to middle school students. We were divided up into three stations; vaccinations, ear notching, and reading of prescriptions. I had the pleasure of helping kids with reading of prescription bottles were I enjoyed listening to all the stories every child just had to tell. It’s always exciting to see how interested and already dedicated the next generations of hog producers are about the industry. The future is bright!

After Youth PQA training was complete we were set free to explore. There were numerous events occurring at the expo from a youth hog show, a trade show, hospitality tents where the amount of free pork meals was abundant, and much more. Having graduated from Iowa State in May of 2011 I was excited to see how many former ISU students had begun their careers within the hog industry ranging from working with NOVUS, ADM, Iowa Pork Producers, and other companies and organizations. I enjoyed catching up with old friends and learn about the new adventures they had begun in their life.

It’s hard to sum up in a few short sentences all that occurred at the World Pork Expo, the number of activities we participated in, and list the numerous individuals we were able to meet. But I know for sure I will be returning in the future!