Nebraska economy relies heavily on pork production

 

 

 

 

 

 

By: Holly Fujan    

There are numerous reasons pork producing is vital to the Nebraska economy and agriculture. Looking at the state of Nebraska, there is no denying that Nebraska is an extremely agricultural state. With cash receipts from agriculture ranked fourth in the nation among all state, only being beaten by California, Texas and Iowa, it is evident that Nebraska’s economy relies strongly on the production of agriculture to maintain the economy.  More importantly if you look at the cash receipts that come from livestock production in Nebraska they equal about sixty percent of all cash receipts that come from agriculture.

The first thing that comes to my mind when I think about the importance of pork production in Nebraska is all the other industries that are driven by the pork industry. When you look at crop production and the amount of corn and soybeans that are needed to feed all the hogs being raised here in Nebraska, without all the feed being consumed the farmer’s who raise these crops would have to cut down on there land and amount of production because there would not be a demand for crops the way there is now. Not only would this effect crop production, but if we think about all the money spent on building to house the hogs, the equipment used to in these building, as well as the trucks and other machinery that are purchased we can see how important pork is to Nebraska. We can also look at all the jobs that are provided to people that are related to the pork industry, whether it might be the farmer’s who raise the crop, the construction companies who build the confinement building, the trucking companies who haul the hogs to market or even the people who work directly with the hogs starting at farrowing all the way to the shelf. Everyone in some way has a hand in the pork industry and without it Nebraska’s economy would be negatively affected.

 

Pork On Your Fork: Honey-Garlic Grilled Chops

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Times

Prep Time: 5 minutes
Cook Time: 15 minutes
Marinating Time: 24 hours

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Ingredients

4 boneless pork chops, 1-inch thick
1/4 cup lemon juice
1/4 cup honey
2 tablespoons soy sauce
1 tablespoon dry sherry
2 cloves garlic , minced

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Cooking Directions

New USDA Guidelines
Combine marinade ingredients and pour over chops in self-sealling plastic bag and seal bag. Refrigerate 4-24 hours.

Prepare covered grill medium-hot coals. Remove chops from marinade (discard marinade). Grill chops over direct heat 10-12 minutes, turning occasionally until internal temperature on a thermometer reads 145 degrees Fahrenheit, followed by a 3-minute rest time.

Serves 4.


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Serving Suggestions

These simple pork chops taste as good as they look. They cook quickly on the grill or in equal time under the broiler. Serve with a carrot-lime salad, steamed green beans, a buttered French loaf on the grill, and a chilled dry Riesling wine.


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Nutrition

Calories: 142 calories
Protein: 18 grams
Fat: 4 grams
Sodium: 193 milligrams
Cholesterol: 48 milligrams
Saturated Fat: 1 grams
Carbohydrates: 7 grams
Fiber: 0 grams

Random Tip:

Don’t overcook your pork!

Recipe from: PorkBeInspired.com

Pork On Your Fork: Barbecue Pork on Buns

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Times

Prep Time: 10 minutes
Cook Time: 6 hours

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Ingredients

2 pound boneless pork loin
1 onion, chopped
3/4 cup cola carbonated beverage
3/4 cup barbecue sauce
8 sandwich buns

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Cooking Directions

Combine all ingredients except buns in a 4-quart slow-cooker; cook, covered, on high for 5-6 hours, until very tender. Drain and slice or shred pork; serve on buns with additional barbecue sauce, if desidered.

Serves 8

Tip: Pork can be made 1-2 days ahead; refrigerate covered and reheat before serving.


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Serving Suggestions

Want the flavor of barbecued sandwiches, but don’t want to get the grill out or turn on the oven? Fix this slow cook version of barbecue pork for sandwiches. Great with Creamy Cabbage Slaw, baked beans and fresh fruit salad.


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Nutrition

Calories: 302 calories
Protein: 29 grams
Fat: 8 grams
Sodium: 490 milligrams
Cholesterol: 65 milligrams
Saturated Fat: 0 grams
Carbohydrates: 28 grams

Random Tip:

Remember! A little pink is ok.

Recipe from: PorkBeInspired.com

Pork farmers are good neighbors

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

By: Levi McPhillips

Take a drive across rural Nebraska, and it will not take long to see hog barns big and small dotting the landscape. Nebraskans from rural and urban areas alike are not always ecstatic about a hog operation moving into the neighborhood. It is unsettling for many to deal with the smell of hog barns. Many of the newest operations do a great job of managing the smell from hog manure. However, many people overlook the good that hog operations do for the land and the people of Nebraska.

Hog producers are a huge benefit to the land. The feed used by hog producers consists of corn, soybeans, and distillers grains. This creates good demand for the crops, and it helps those in agriculture to work together to put food on everyone’s table. The manure from the hogs is also used to fertilize the fields that grew the corn and soybeans. With the rising cost of fertilizer, the demand for hog manure continues to grow. The chemicals in the manure help replace lost nutrients from intense modern crop production. The swine industry has helped sustain crop production around the world.

Those who raise pigs also do everything in their power to care for the animals as well. The swine industry has come under increased scrutiny in recent years over the barns used to raise the animals. Many believe that the animals would be healthier if they were outside in a more natural setting. The truth is that putting hogs in a confinement protects them from the extreme weather conditions experienced in Nebraska. It also allows us to monitor their health more intensely. An animal that is stressed, uncomfortable, or neglected does not eat, and an animal that does not eat will not gain weight. It is counterproductive for producers to neglect their animals.

Another way the hog industry is good for Nebraska is that it provides good, well-paying jobs to a great number of people.  Animal caretakers, nutritionists, economists, truck drivers, managers, and veterinarians are just a few of the jobs available in the swine industry. The good neighbors in the swine industry are dedicated to providing safe food to millions of people. The disease management, vaccine monitoring, and animal welfare practices are all done to ensure the safety and quality of meat to be consumed by people just like you. Hog producers are dedicated to caring for the people they employ and the people they feed.

My family’s operation is a great example of this. We produce 6,000 finished hogs annually on our farm near Lindsay, NE. My father Bill and I are dedicated to making sure that every pig gets attention everyday. My dad is constantly changing and re-evaluating his nutrition plan to find the ration that is good for the animal and good for us. My father feeds the corn that he grows with his two brothers, and he fertilizes his corn fields with the manure from his barns. My dad has been such a good example to me. He is a man who cares about the animals, the land, and the thousands of people that he feeds every year.

This is a picture of my family’s operation near Lindsay, NE. McPhillips Brothers Farm produces 6,000 pigs annually and also raises corn and soybeans.

This is a picture of one of our pigs. Taking care of animals has been one of my life’s ambitions and working with my father helped me get my start in the livestock industry.

Pork On Your Fork: BBQ Baby Back Ribs with Spicy Girls’ Dry Rub and Mop Sauce

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Times

Prep Time: 15 minutes
Cook Time: 2 hours
Marinating Time: 30 minutes

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Ingredients

3 racks pork baby back ribs, 1 1/2 pounds each
3 cups hickory or apple wood chips
vegetable oil, for brushing

Spicy Girls’ Dry Rub:

1/4 cup kosher salt
2 tablespoons coarsely ground black pepper
1 tablespoon ground coriander
3 tablespoons ground cumin
2 tablespoons paprika
2 tablespoons dried thyme
2 tablespoons chili powder
1/4 cup dark brown sugar, packed

Hickory Barbecue Mop Sauce:

2 cups hickory barbecue sauce, store bought
1 tablespoon liquid smoke
2 tablespoons maple syrup
2 tablespoons dark molasses


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Cooking Directions

To make Spicy Girls’ Dry Rub, in medium bowl combine all ingredients for the rub and stir well to blend. Place ribs flat in a non-reactive roasting pan. Using 3/4 cup of the rub, sprinkle over both sides of each rack and rub in lightly. Set aside.

Soak wood chips in cold water to cover for at least 30 minutes. Set up grill for indirect cooking. Prepare a medium fire in a charcoal grill or preheat one side of a gas or electric grill on medium. Drain chips and sprinkle half over the coals or place half in the grill’s smoker box. Place a disposable foil pan under the grate to catch drippings.

Brush grill grate with vegetable oil. Arrange ribs, meaty-side down, on the side of the grill without hot coals. Cover the grill and smoke-cook the ribs for 45 minutes. Turn ribs and add remaining wood chips. Cover and grill for another 45 minutes.

While ribs are grill-smoking, make Hickory Barbecue Mop Sauce. Combine store-bought hickory barbecue sauce, liquid smoke, maple syrup and molasses in a bowl. Stir well to combine.

When the ribs have cooked for a total of 11/2 hours, brush the ribs generously with the mop sauce. Using long-handled tongs, slide the ribs onto the grate directly over the hot coals. Grill, uncovered, 5 minutes. Turn the ribs over, baste again, and grill another 5 minutes. Cut between the bones, slicing the racks into individual ribs. Serve immediately.

Serves 6 to 8.


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Serving Suggestions

Ribs have double the flavor with a dry rub and then a great doctored sauce. Serve with fresh sliced tomatoes, grilled potatoes and sliced icy cold watermelon.


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Nutrition

Calories: 830 calories
Protein: 43 grams
Fat: 65 grams
Sodium: 1120 milligrams
Cholesterol: 205 milligrams
Saturated Fat: 23 grams
Carbohydrates: 17 grams
Fiber: 3 grams

Random Safety Tip:

Cover a plate with plastic wrap to carry pork to the grill. Throw away. Use the clean plate carry food back in!

Recipe from: PorkBeInspired.com

Farm Family Impacts

 

 

 

 

 

 

By: Erin Oswald

To those of you who grew up on the farm with your family or now handle the family farm, answer this question: What does it mean to you to be a family farm?

I contemplated this question for a long time, trying to pinpoint the exact reason why growing up on the farm with my family and still getting to help in production today is so incredible. Then it hit me this morning. There is no single reason. The reasons are innumerable.

Consider who and what your family farm impacts. Your first thought might jump to the consumer. The consumer isn’t the only one though! In small towns such as Madison, where my family farm is located, the entire town can be affected by our operation. My parents love to support the local businesses they love in and near town. This boosts the economy of our small town. As a small family farm, we seek to minimize costs, so we use our resources to our advantage by spreading hog manure into the fields for fertilizer (Mom likes to snatch some up for her booming gardens too!). Another impact area is the space of these family farms. Near cities, farm ground is being swallowed up for housing developments and other projects. Family farms serve another dual purpose by providing fresh, open spaces. These impact areas of local businesses, smart resource use, and green space are just a few of the ways a family farm can have positive influence. Let’s look at the question from a new perspective now.

So, what does it mean to be a family farm? For me, it begins and ends with the word family. From the time I was born, I was taught to do my part around the farm. Even if it meant riding with Dad to the pork plant early in the morning before I was much taller than the pigs we were hauling. And, as I’m sure you can all agree, with age comes responsibility. My three siblings and I grew around the farm like a tree growing on or around any object in its path. We soaked it all in! We were taught to scrape platforms, help with feedings, give injections, and sort and move hogs on our own. A couple of years ago, being part of my family farm meant getting up at 4:30 A.M. every Tuesday to help Dad sort hogs. I’d be lying if I didn’t admit that those weeks made me love the farm more than I thought I could! I became an asset to the farm and noticed that I began saying ‘our’ farm instead of  ‘my dad’s’ farm. The farm is ours, my family’s.

And let’s not forget the queen of the operation: Mom. Now answer this question: Would the family farm be as successful (or existent) as it is today without the help and hard work of every mom? I believe the answer is no. On our farm, mom is the heart and soul. She’s always ready to put on her boots and help dad! She won’t turn down a single job, and for good reason: nothing is too big or hard for Mom to handle!

My mom has been the greatest inspiration on our farm for my sisters and I and what it means to truly be a hard worker and diligent and committed mother and wife. My mom, just like the multitude of blessed farm moms, is dedicated to the operation and keeps everyone going each day! I know that without her, this family farm would only be a lowly farm. Thank you, Mom!

With Mother’s Day in the books already for this year, take some extra time to thank your farm mom or wife for everything she does! I know I certainly will!