Tenderloin Tuesday: Sausage-Spinach Quiche

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Times

Prep Time: 20 minutes
Cook Time: 45 minutes

Ingredients Icon

Ingredients

8 ounces pork sausage (bulk)
1 pastry pie shell
1/4 cup onion, chopped
1 clove garlic , minced
1 10-ounce package frozen spinach, chopped
1 cup Cheddar cheese, shredded (4 ounces)
4 eggs, slightly beaten
1 cup light cream
1/4 teaspoon salt
3 cherry tomatoes (optional), halved
watercress sprigs (optional)

Cooking Directions Icon

Cooking Directions

New USDA Guidelines
Prepare pastry and set aside.Crumble sausage in medium skillet; add onion and garlic. Cook over medium heat till sausage is browned, stirring occasionally; drain well.Thaw spinach, drain well. Remove remaining moisture by pressing spinach between layers of paper toweling. Add spinach to sausage mixture; mix well.

Sprinkle cheese evenly in pastry shell. Top with sausage mixture. In a medium mixing bowl combine eggs, cream and salt; mix well. Pour egg mixture over sausage mixture.

Bake in a 375 degree F. oven for 45 minutes or until a knife inserted halfway between center and outer edge comes out clean. Let stand 10 minutes before serving. Garnish with cherry tomatoes and watercress, if desired.

Serves 6


Serving Suggestions Icon

Serving Suggestions

Serve this with croissants and seasonal fresh fruit. This recipe can also be adapted to make small tart quiches for appetizers.


Nutrition Icon

Nutrition

Calories: 509 calories
Protein: 18 grams
Fat: 41 grams
Sodium: 754 milligrams
Cholesterol: 214 milligrams
Saturated Fat: 17 grams
Carbohydrates: 19 grams
Fiber: 2 grams

Random Safety Tip:

If using a microwave to thaw your pork, cook immediately after thawing.

Recipe from: PorkBeInspired.com

Recently…

By: Shannon Wietjes and Ali Steuer, Mentoring Students

Recently…in the student realm.

 

 

 

 

 


Shannon Wietjes

          I’m a senior in college this year, which means I am on the job hunt.  I’ve had a few internships throughout my college career and am involved in several great organizations, like the Pork Mentoring program through the Nebraska Pork Producers Association, where I have expanded my knowledge about the agricultural industry.  I have a passion for agriculture and know I will always have more to learn about the industry.  However, in the interviews I’ve experienced so far I have felt bombarded with questions about specific aspects of the industry and am expected to know everything in order to get a job. Unlike many of my peers who have similar interests in the agricultural industry, I attend Nebraska Wesleyan University, which has allowed me the opportunity to teach my peers at NWU about agriculture, because many of them are not from an agriculture background.  Unfortunately, I have noticed in my recent interviews that the fact I don’t have the chance to take agriculture classes at NWU may hurt my chances to get a job in some parts of the industry. 

         I love agriculture and I want to learn more about it.  I have made it my mission to teach others about the food they eat and the industry that keeps them full and clothed.  While it is a challenge to show potential employers that I am willing to learn even though I don’t take classes that directly relate to agriculture, I know that this industry is where I belong and I will have to work even harder than my peers who decided to take classes that directly relate to the industry.  Learning is a continuous process, and even though I will be graduating in May, I am excited to see where I end up within the agricultural industry and expand my knowledge about agriculture throughout my life.  Learning is a lifelong process and I want to show others that I can be a part of the agriculture industry despite my lack of formal education in the industry.  Who knows where I’ll end up; but one thing I do know is that I’m up for the challenge of helping and promoting agriculture.

To read Shannon’s agriculture column in the Nebraska Wesleyan Reveille (school paper), follow this link: http://www.thereveillenwu.com/opinions.

Recently…in the production realm.

 

 

 

 

 

 


Ali Steuer 

 

         Just last month, during National Pork Month, the United States passed the largest trade agreement since 1994 with countries Panama, Columbia, and South Korea.  The long awaited bilateral trade agreements were passed on October 12, 2011, after years of negotiations first initiated by the Bush Administration.  With negotiations beginning in 2006 in Columbia and 2007 with both Panama and South Korea, these trade agreements have been much anticipated by those in the agricultural sector. 

           According to Bob Livingston, “The agreement with South Korea will remove duties on about two-thirds of American farm exports, as well as phase out tariffs on more than 95 percent of industrial and consumer exports over the next five years.”  The bilateral agreement with South Korea is by far the most significant in terms of agricultural trade.  According to the USDA, in 2010 South Korea ranks first of the three countries in two-way U.S. agricultural trade.  Of the three, they also have the largest population and the strongest, most developed economy.   Those hog producers which specialize in the area of exporting meat to Japan and Singapore can also expect a new market to engage in the trans-Pacific area.

 

          This graph shows the projected “piece of pie” that South Korea, Columbia, and Panama will share in all U.S. Agricultural Exports.  (USDA, 2011.)

           The trade agreement provisions in the Free Trade Agreements with South Korea, Colombia, and Panama combined are estimated to result in between $2.3 billion (USDA’s Economic Research Service) and $3.1 billion (U.S. International Trade Commission) in higher agricultural exports.  For the agricultural industry as a whole, with particular emphasis on the pork industry, the free trade agreements were a source of significant news.  With one in four pigs produced in the United States already being used for exports, it is exciting to see the United States pass these agreements.  US hog producers can expect in the future a greater world demand for their product! I commend the Obama Administration for increasing foreign relations as well as helping the United States agricultural sector.

Sharing Thanks

I have been working for the Nebraska Pork Producers Association for a little over four years. Year after year, thank you notes pour into my office. Handwritten messages express thanks for sharing education materials, sponsoring a special agriculture related event, or just giving time.

These messages warm my heart and some make me laugh. With Thanksgiving upon us, I thought it would be special to share a few of the thank you notes with you. I am only able to provide opportunities for youth in the swine industry and in agriculture in Nebraska because of you, Nebraska pork producers, through your Checkoff investment.

 

Pork Checkoff — your investment, your future!

Happy Thanksgiving everyone!

kdw

Tenderloin Tuesday: Apricot-Glazed Ham

Apricot-Glazed Ham

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Times

Prep Time: 10 minutes
Cook Time: 1 hour, 30 minutes

Ingredients Icon

Ingredients

5 pound fully cooked whole boneless ham
1/3 cup firmly packed brown sugar
1 tablespoon cornstarch
1/2 teaspoon nutmeg
1/4 teaspoon cloves
2/3 cup apricot nectar
2 tablespoons lemon juice

Cooking Directions Icon

Cooking Directions

New USDA Guidelines
Place ham on rack in a shallow roasting pan. Bake, uncovered, in a 325 degree F. oven for 1 1/4 hours or until meat thermometer registers 140 degrees F. (about 15-18 minutes per pound.)

For the glaze, in a small saucepan combine brown sugar, cornstarch, nutmeg and cloves. Stir in apricot nectar and lemon juice. Cook over medium heat until thickened and bubbly, stirring constantly.

Brush ham with glaze. Continue baking 15-20 minutes more, brushing occasionally with glaze.

Serves 20


Serving Suggestions Icon

Serving Suggestions

A simple glaze over ham makes for an easy special occasion meal. Serve with green bean casserole, Garlic Mashed Potatoes, and fruit salad.


Nutrition Icon

Nutrition

Calories: 208 calories
Protein: 25 grams
Fat: 9 grams
Sodium: 1572 milligrams
Cholesterol: 64 milligrams
Saturated Fat: 3 grams
Carbohydrates: 6 grams
Fiber: 0 grams

Random Cooking Tip:

When you are in a hurry—turn to cuts that cook up quickly, such as chops, tenderloins and cutlets.

Recipe from: PorkBeInspired.com

Thank a Farmer

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

By: Ann Oswald, mentoring student

It’s Thanksgiving Day and you’re sitting around the table laden with food. Of course there’s turkey, ham, and hopefully some roast beef. The delectable looking bowls of stuffing, mashed potatoes, and cranberry salad would make even Martha Stewart envious.

But before the blessing is said and the eating begins, everyone takes a turn going around the table, telling of something for which they are thankful. What will you say this year? Although we could (and should) go around the table hundreds of times with our ‘thanksgivings’, let’s focus on the group of people who made this mouth-watering food on our table a reality….farmers.

The work of farmers endures every day of the year. Animals must be fed, watered, and housed properly through all types of weather. Fields are made ready and seeds planted in the spring. Throughout the summer, land is checked daily as farmers keep bugs and weeds out, while anxiously watching their investment grow. As the crops mature and become ready for harvest, farmers spend days and evenings harvesting the crop. Once sold or stored for later use, the farmer has a myriad of jobs around the farm until beginning this series of events again.

So I began to think, how can we show our appreciation and thanks for all that farmers do? I thought about an all-expense-paid trip to Hawaii, or a new tractor. For all they do, either would be well deserved. Unfortunately, for me, a lowly college student, this type of gift isn’t going to happen. (Should you be willing to contribute, however, I know some farmers [i.e. Dad and Mom] who could be packed and ready to board a plane in 24 hours, just let me know.)

All joking aside, our farmers are men and women who enjoy providing for you and I. They delight in the land and lifestyles they live. For their dedication to providing safe, quality food products for Nebraska and the world, we must be thankful. Although we know it’s not nearly enough for all they do, join me as we gather around our Thanksgiving tables, and give a heart-felt ‘thank you’ to our farmers.